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The+amount+of+carbon+dioxide+is+higher+than+at+any+time+in+the+last+800%2C000+years.+And+the+Earth%27s+average+temperature+is+increasing+at+a+concerning+rate+according+to+the+Earth+Observatory.
The amount of carbon dioxide is higher than at any time in the last 800,000 years. And the Earth's average temperature is increasing at a concerning rate according to the Earth Observatory.

The amount of carbon dioxide is higher than at any time in the last 800,000 years. And the Earth's average temperature is increasing at a concerning rate according to the Earth Observatory.

The amount of carbon dioxide is higher than at any time in the last 800,000 years. And the Earth's average temperature is increasing at a concerning rate according to the Earth Observatory.

Dolly Lopez, Editor

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The Climate Change March took over the streets of Philadelphia and Washington D.C. on Saturday, April 29th. My friends and I were surrounded by diverse crowds holding colorful posters and yelling chants. As we walked down the streets, it was also crowded with police blocking off the roads so cars can’t get through and to give us the streets for the march. As we passed bystanders on the sidewalk, people were smiling with excitement and taking photos and videos to spread the news of the demonstration.

We yelled chants consisting of the safety of Standing Rock and the Native Americans’ land, Donald Trump’s presidency and his lack of environmental policies, and big corporations taking advantage of the Earth to make more profit.

The People’s Climate Movement was organized with the intention to demonstrate unity for jobs, justice, and climate action. More than 300,000 people in Washington D.C. and 370 sister marches across the country joined together on the 100th day of Trump’s Presidency to exercise their first amendment right of freedom of assembly. The crowds consisted of workers, students, Indigenous Nations, and environmental groups. The march was joined together to make clear that this resistance will defend our communities and the well being of our planet. On the People’s Climate Movement’s homepage, there’s a significant quote that stands out the most.

Now, together, we will chart another path for America: away from Trump’s agenda that is a cruel, polluted and divided country, and towards a clean energy economy that works for everyone.”

The events for that day began at sunrise. Cheyenne River Sioux tribal members traveled 1,536 miles by bus from Eagle Bend, South Dakota. They organized a water ceremony led by Indigenous people at the Capitol Reflecting Pool at Washington, D.C. Afterwards, they held an opening press conference. Representatives from front line communities spoke out about impacts that climate change and pollution was having on their lives. They called out the Trump administration for making their crisis worse. They demanded a renewable energy economy to create good paying, new and union jobs. Lastly, they demand that the country prioritize low-income and people of color communities.

The march in Philadelphia began at 2:00 and was led by young people of color and Indigenous leaders from across the country. They led us up the streets in front of City hall and we began our march with cheers. A senior student named Daphne Marquis from Perkiomen Valley attended the march on that Saturday afternoon. When asked about her experience at the demonstration, she replied with,

“I thought it was a very inspiring event. Many social issues were touched on throughout the day, not just climate change. I hope to be part of this movement each and every year but I hope that it simply isn’t necessary for much longer.”

Another senior from Perkiomen Valley joined us for the event named Clare Korbisch. Korbisch added by saying,

“I thought the experience was incredible and intriguing. The entire march was about much more than just climate change. People were discussing the Earth in general, politics, and more. Hopefully I’ll be able to go years in the future and help support the cause.”

Thousands of people and I matched down the streets in 90 degree weather with the hot sun pouring down on us. Walking down the middle of the street from City Hall to the Schuylkill River and also holding my huge poster high above my head was exhausting. However, attending the event gave me a wonderful feeling of pride. Knowing that it was done all for the security of our mother Earth, and our generation, and future generations was completely worth the exhaustion in the end of the day.

 

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